Tudor seapower: When Britannia first ruled the waves

Thirty years ago, the wreck of the Mary Rose, pride of Henry VIII’s navy, rose from the seabed to the gasps of a live TV audience of millions. Neil Faulkner takes the opportunity to review the rise of English seapower in the early 16th century.…

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Britain at war in colour

Britain at War in Colour, released later this spring, reveals 100 of the best original images from the IWM collection. Some of them have been previously published – either in American magazines after the war, or more recently in books – but others are appearing in print for the first…

Raising the dead, 1865

In June 1864, Cold Harbor was the site of a fortnight-long battle during the American Civil War.

A year later, photographer John Reekie visited the battlefield and captured pictures of men as they roamed the fields, collecting and reburying the bones of dead soldiers.…

Airpower comes of Age, 1917-1918

In the last year of WWI, airpower became a major factor – so much so that the British turned their air contingents, previously treated as adjuncts of the Army or the Navy into a unified RAF. Was the diversion of resources worth it?…

Sink the Tirpitz!

John Sweetman analyses the relative failure of repeated Fleet Air Arm attacks on the German battleship Tirpitz.…

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